ONE HOLY NIGHT SANDRA CISNEROS PDF

Email Characters Ixchel is a naive thirteen year old girl who is taken advantage of by a man who deliberately lies about his life to lure her in. She overlooks all the bad signs in order to live out her ideal of a real love. Chaq, or Boy Baby, is a thirty-seven year old man who lures young girls in and lies about himself, takes advantage of them, and kills them. He feels that lying is a form of power and control over the girls. He tells her amazing stories about himself while she listens in awe. Eventually, Boy Baby makes Ixchel pregnant and he disappears.

Author:Kisho Tygozilkree
Country:Albania
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Video
Published (Last):27 November 2017
Pages:200
PDF File Size:11.45 Mb
ePub File Size:11.49 Mb
ISBN:410-9-79481-623-1
Downloads:93364
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Dogul



Boy Baby, she says, is the descendant of Mayan kings. Ixchel confesses that she has never told anybody this story except her two friends Rachel and Lourdes. By including this detail, Cisneros is able to lure readers toward Boy Baby with the same kind of curiosity that attracts Ixchel to him. As such, Cisneros demonstrates how that which is forbidden so often feels unavoidable. Boy Baby arrives and buys a mango on a stick—every Saturday thereafter, he comes to buy fruit from the cart, telling Ixchel each time to keep the change.

She notes that readers might not be so fond of him, especially since his fingernails are greasy and his long hair dusty.

All the same, she waits for him every Saturday in a pretty blue dress. Rather than examining the many disturbing warning signs that Boy Baby is a dangerous person, she would rather move forward as if he is a man with no background.

Above all, this willful ignorance is a sign of her immaturity and an indication that she is most likely unprepared to advance in this romantic relationship. Download it! Ixchel touches him, but the look he gives her is cold and faraway. Then something inside seems to bite her, and she whimpers softly, crying for another version of herself that seems to leap out of her body and run away forever.

Only an eighth-grader, she has crossed the threshold of adulthood long before she can fully conceptualize the implications, and yet she still experiences the feeling of suddenly entering a new realm of maturity. In this way, Cisneros spotlights the internal process of coming of age, which sometimes expresses itself in abstract ways, proving that young people are capable of feeling intense and advanced emotions even if they experience them inarticulately, as Ixchel does in this moment with the surreal image of a version of herself leaving her own body.

I, Ixchel, his queen. On the one hand, something monumental has just happened in her life, an experience that deserves to be exalted if only for how much it will change her conception of the world. On the other hand, every single person in the history of the world has been the product of sexual reproduction, rendering the entire act a rather ordinary thing.

In the following days, Abuelita learns more and more of the truth. Hearing this, Abuelita goes to the garage to find Boy Baby, but discovers he has moved away, leaving the pushcart behind as a way of paying his outstanding rent.

As such, his previously mysterious qualities begin to seem sinister, and whatever tenderness he has showed Ixchel becomes even more disturbing.

When Abuelita discovers her granddaughter is pregnant, she weeps and blames Uncle Lalo, who blames the United States. In the coming weeks, Abuelita periodically returns to the garage in the hopes of gaining information about Boy Baby—the demonio, in her words—and his whereabouts. Picking up his mail, she finds a letter from a convent in another town. She writes to this convent and asks the nuns if they know where Boy Baby might be hiding.

Meanwhile, she removes Ixchel from school when her uniform stretches tightly over her stomach. Rather than accepting the notion that Ixchel made a conscious decision to indulge her own sexual desires, she blames the nearest man in her life, as if only men can influence women when it comes to sex. In this moment, Cisneros plumbs the murky waters surrounding agency and sexual independence, once more demonstrating how the process of coming of age is complex and difficult to navigate.

Consequently, she arranges to send Ixchel to live with her cousins in Mexico, where she was originally conceived. Active Themes A letter arrives from the convent. In this moment, it becomes even more clear that he has manipulated Ixchel, capitalizing on and exploiting her young naivety. When the family next hears about him, it is in a newspaper article displaying a picture of him held by two police officers.

In turn, Cisneros illustrates that love is not a rational feeling, but rather an illogical and impulsive emotion. Simply put, the feelings humans experience for one another are often out of step with what makes sense, and longing frequently overtakes a person despite her better judgment.

She remembers a crazy man who used to live upstairs. Unable to talk, he used to keep a harmonica in his mouth at all times. This is both beautiful and deeply complicated, something to be appreciated but also something that can become a burden. By using this metaphor for love, Ixchel reveals a nuanced and varied understanding, a conception of romance that is far beyond her years.

Lannamann, Taylor. Retrieved March 10, Copy to Clipboard.

COUNTERPOINT WALTER PISTON PDF

ONE HOLY NIGHT SANDRA CISNEROS PDF

Boy Baby, she says, is the descendant of Mayan kings. Ixchel confesses that she has never told anybody this story except her two friends Rachel and Lourdes. By including this detail, Cisneros is able to lure readers toward Boy Baby with the same kind of curiosity that attracts Ixchel to him. As such, Cisneros demonstrates how that which is forbidden so often feels unavoidable. Boy Baby arrives and buys a mango on a stick—every Saturday thereafter, he comes to buy fruit from the cart, telling Ixchel each time to keep the change. She notes that readers might not be so fond of him, especially since his fingernails are greasy and his long hair dusty. All the same, she waits for him every Saturday in a pretty blue dress.

EDWARD TOPSELL PDF

The House on Mango Street & Woman Hollering Creek & Other Stories

Taukazahn Do you really want to ine this prezi? Detailed explanations, analysis, and citation info for every important quote on LitCharts. This is both beautiful and deeply complicated, something to be appreciated but also something that can become a burden. The narrator still loves him and cannot bear to look at the picture.

Related Articles