GEORGE ETHEREGE THE MAN OF MODE PDF

Start your review of The Man of Mode Write a review Shelves: drama Reread: Aug With the first re-reading of this play along with the reading of William Wycherleys The Country Wife before this, I am in the process of discovering the rich literary quality associated with the Restoration Theatre in the Great Britain. With striking similarities between the two plays on the level of plot lines, characterisation and milieu, my understanding of this genre in British Literature has been greatly enhanced, of which I shall talk about in the current review. Firstly, both Wycherley and Etherage come up with dramatic prose and not the much popular dramatic verse of the bygone Elizabethan age. What is more interesting to note is that this prose that they make use of is more natural or colloquial rather than that which is meant for mere affectation, the manner in which it was sometimes use in the earlier periods of English literary history. Other than this the issue of identity can also be studied in the way that characters are often encountered to complain of the changing or rather deteriorating trend in some or all the factors mentioned above. This perhaps could be see as part of either adhering strictly or breaking free entirely and in some cases adapting oneself into accepting some and rejecting some other qualities of both the past and the contemporary age.

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Start your review of The Man of Mode Write a review Shelves: drama Reread: Aug With the first re-reading of this play along with the reading of William Wycherleys The Country Wife before this, I am in the process of discovering the rich literary quality associated with the Restoration Theatre in the Great Britain.

With striking similarities between the two plays on the level of plot lines, characterisation and milieu, my understanding of this genre in British Literature has been greatly enhanced, of which I shall talk about in the current review. Firstly, both Wycherley and Etherage come up with dramatic prose and not the much popular dramatic verse of the bygone Elizabethan age.

What is more interesting to note is that this prose that they make use of is more natural or colloquial rather than that which is meant for mere affectation, the manner in which it was sometimes use in the earlier periods of English literary history. Other than this the issue of identity can also be studied in the way that characters are often encountered to complain of the changing or rather deteriorating trend in some or all the factors mentioned above.

This perhaps could be see as part of either adhering strictly or breaking free entirely and in some cases adapting oneself into accepting some and rejecting some other qualities of both the past and the contemporary age. That the value attributed to morality and indigenous fashion was certainly not much becomes obvious.

The latter is evident in the fact that a lot of focus is seen to have been placed on fashion, not that, however, which had its origin in the native English society but that of France. Especially in The Man of Mode we find so many allusions to French manners, French music and dance, French dressing, French writers, French - the language, etc.

Even though it was my second reading of the play, the complexity of its plot kept me intrigued till the end. Superabundance of wit is clearly visible in the various scenes where the characters engage in long bouts of repartee. This is especially true in context of the male members of the English society of that time, though in no way, the dramas suggests, that women — especially those interested — did not partake in using it themselves.

Lastly, the complex that the plot and characterisation forms in The Man of Mode does really qualify it to be a typical representative of its genre that abounds in aesthetics and reason both.

With its various characters falling in and falling out of love and good-will with each other the plot, just within the span of five acts, achieves a remarkable unity of time, place and action.

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George Etherege

Plot[ edit ] The protagonist of The Man of Mode is Dorimant, a notorious libertine and man-about-town. The story opens with Dorimant addressing a billet-doux to Mrs. Loveit, with whom he is having an affair, to lie about his whereabouts. An "Orange-Woman" is let in and informs him of the arrival in London of a beautiful heiress — later known to be Harriet. Dorimant expresses his wish to break off his relationship with Mrs. Loveit, being already involved with her younger friend Belinda.

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